Self-Supply at Scale: Lessons from rural Bangladesh

by Jonathan Annis is a sanitation and innovation specialist with the USAID-funded WASHplus project (www.washplus.org). His views do not represent those of USAID or the U.S. Government. I recently traveled to southeastern Bangladesh to support WASHplus’s local implementing partner WaterAid as it begins a multi-year project in the coastal belt. The coastal belt is a … Continue reading Self-Supply at Scale: Lessons from rural Bangladesh

USAID and Rotary International adopt innovative sustainability monitoring tool

A new sustainability tool for WASH

water services that last

By Harold Lockwood 

This is great news and fantastic to see USAID adopting and promoting this approach which aims to really track and better understand the underlying causes of poor sustainability in the WASH sector. Sustaining WASH services is complex and dependent not only the hardware (the pumps, latrines and pipes), but also a range of the so-called software elements, for example reliable management entities, long-term external support and monitoring, adequate financing and so on. Measuring coverage is one thing, looking at functionality is also a useful proxy, but if we really want to know where the pinch-points are and how something so seemingly simple as water flowing out of a tap can fall down, it requires a comprehensive and powerful tool.

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New RWSN publication on EMAS Technologies in Bolivia

EMAS has been promoting low cost technologies for rural water supplies in Bolivia for over 30 years - with considerable success. EMAS technologies comprise manually drilled wells, a locally fabricated pump and rainwater harvesting technologies. EMAS are combining low-cost water supply solutions with a relatively high level of service at the household. Today RWSN publishes … Continue reading New RWSN publication on EMAS Technologies in Bolivia

TAF to be tested on other technologies Rwenzori region

WASHTech update from Uganda

WASHTech, THE project (2011-2013)

A comment from the recently concluded Hand Pump Mechanics Association Learning Visit to Rwenzori region indicated the need for the Technology Applicability Framework (TAF) to be tested on existing technologies in the region like the Manual drilling rig. This was  raised after a presentation made by NETWAS Uganda at the learning journey about the progress of the TAF. The suggestion was later lauded by HEWASA, a local NGO promoting manual drilling in Rwenzori who indicated that in order to scale up their technology, there was need for recommendations from the TAF.

The HPMA learning visit was organized to provide learning for the social, economic and technical transformation of the HPMAs functionality in Northern Uganda. And to be able to use the knowledge acquired to improve sustainability of water supply systems in the region. This gathering attracted 40 participants from regions of North, West and Central.

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Still or sparkling? Lessons from a WASH holiday

Rural water challenges are not just an African issue…

water services that last

I suspect that some of you, readers of this blog, are equal water nerds as I am, and that you also take your professional interest along on holiday. At least, I cannot resist visiting the odd water works or taking photographs of the local water and sanitation facilities during my holidays. This summer holiday I not only had the opportunity to take photos, but to live for a week the type of rural water situation, that I write about so much, but rarely experience in reality. As I spent my vacation on a family visit to my brother, who is managing a farm in the Moldovan rural village of Cuhureştii de Jos, I got some first-hand experience of the common problems around rural water supply and realized that some of the myths around it, are myths indeed.

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