Cautiously optimistic

More useful analysis from the Triple-S team

water services that last

What will it take to create WASH sectors that work? 

By Patrick Moriarty, Harold Lockwood, and Sarah Carriger

Over the past few months in a series of posts we’ve been advocating for a change in the goal of the WASH sector – from increasing coverage to delivering a service over the long haul; from simply building infrastructure to building infrastructure and managing it into the future to provide services worthy of the name.

And we’ve been calling for a change in approach — from piecemeal projects to strengthening the whole system that delivers services.

We’ve shown how we’ve gone about supporting this type of change in Ghana together with the Community Water and Sanitation Agency, and we’ll continue posting examples from other countries where we’re working.

For now, in the final post in this series, we’d like to talk more about what committing to this change calls for from…

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How much water is enough? Determining realistic water use in developing countries

Excellent thoughts on water quantities – how much is enough?

Improve International

By Susan Davis, Executive Director, Improve International

Water from a handpump in KenyaHow much water do you use every day? If you live in the US, you probably don’t think about it much, even if you pay for what you use.  Do you know how much water people in developing countries use?  A lot less than Americans, for sure.  But exactly how much turns out to be quite variable.

I thought it would be helpful to share the results of a desk review we did on water quantities measured or reported in developing countries.  The most comprehensive data referenced in studies comes from the Drawers of Water study (White, Bradley, & White, 1972), the first large-scale assessment of domestic water use in Africa, and Drawers of Water II (IIED et al, 1997); however, both are outdated and distinguish only between piped and unpiped water systems.

Not surprisingly, people are likely to use more…

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Reposted from: "Fluor is an element abundant in nature. In the right quantities, it is essential for the development of teeth and bones. However, under specific conditions, the concentration of fluoride (F) in ground and surface water can exceed safety levels and becomes toxic for human health. This may lead to skeletal and/or dental … Continue reading “FLUORIDE IN GROUNDWATER: A DEBILITATING SCOURGE” Catalyst Project Webinar, 2 May

Understanding why waterpoints fail

By Vincent Casey, Technical Support Manager, and Richard Carter.  (originally posted on the WaterAid website) From the Catalyst Project: "A hidden crisis? Strengthening the evidence base on the sustainability of rural groundwater services" "Every year, over 30,000 boreholes fitted with handpumps are installed in rural areas of Sub-Saharan Africa. All will break down at some … Continue reading Understanding why waterpoints fail

Getting the basics right

I've just returned from Liberia, where Kerstin Danert and I, together with Caesar Hall and Jenny Schmitzer are coaching, training and mentoring staff across from government agencies to prepare the first a Sector Performance Report (SPR) for Liberia. Ultimately, this this could become an annual report for the whole WASH sector across the country. It … Continue reading Getting the basics right