The most important stories in rural water supply // Les histoires d’approvisionnement en eau en milieu rural les plus importants

Making water work for women – inspiring stories from around the world The reality in much of the world today is that collecting water for the home is a job done by women – so gender issues are central to everything we do in rural water supply – self-supply, pump design, borehole siting, tariff collection, … Continue reading The most important stories in rural water supply // Les histoires d’approvisionnement en eau en milieu rural les plus importants

Webinar 16.11.2016 / Webinar el día 16.11.2016 – “A tool for Monitoring the Scaling up of Water and Sanitation Technologies”

Texto en español más abajo From the RWSN secretariat we herewith announce the latest webinar of our mini-series 2016, which will take place on 16.11.2016. The title of the event is “A tool for Monitoring the Scaling up of Water and Sanitation Technologies (TAF – Technology Applicability Framework)” and it will focus on the use … Continue reading Webinar 16.11.2016 / Webinar el día 16.11.2016 – “A tool for Monitoring the Scaling up of Water and Sanitation Technologies”

Rural water supply for all, forever: Can Nicaragua become an example?

by H. Holtslag  J. de JonghOf the 780 million people worldwide without an improved water source some 80% live in rural areas. In sub-Saharan countries some 35% of the rural water points are not functioning. A country with a remarkable and sustainable increase in rural water supply is Nicaragua. This country has 6 million people … Continue reading Rural water supply for all, forever: Can Nicaragua become an example?

Coffee talk: Jonathan Wiles of Living Water International

Improve International

By Susan Davis, Executive Director, Improve International

[Full transparency: this conversation was over the telephone and the resulting blog was finished over email, but I was drinking coffee the whole time.] Jonathan Wiles is Vice President for Program Excellence at Living Water International. By training, he is an organizational strategist, communicator, and program developer. Jonathan has been involved in the WASH sector for more than a decade, during which he has been a researcher/practitioner in programs across three continents. Find him on Twitter @thirstforchange

Susan: You launched your new strategic plan in February 2011 – what were the key reasons for that plan, and how did it come together?

Jonathan: Living Water International was born in the early 90’s, when water development—this was before anyone was talking about “WASH”—was all about installing hardware. We all thought that a little village-level maintenance training was enough to ensure sustainability, and that…

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