From Tractors to the Tara pump

This year we are celebrating 30 years since the Rural Water Supply Network was formally founded. From very technical beginnings as a group of (mostly male) experts – the Handpump Technology Network- we have evolved to be a diverse and vibrant network of over 13,000 people and 100 organisations working on a wide range of topics. Along the way, we have earned a reputation for impartiality, and become a global convener in the rural water sector.

RWSN would not be what it is today without the contributions and tireless efforts of many our members, organisations and people. As part of RWSN’s 30th anniversary celebration, we are running a blog series on rwsn.blog, inviting our friends and experts in the sector to share their thoughts and experiences in the rural water sector.

This is a guest blog by RWSN Member Erich Baumann, based in Ireland.

I grew up in Switzerland after graduating as a mechanical engineer, and started working in the agricultural sector, designing tractors with reasonable success. Back then, (in the late seventies) the Swiss tractor industry was suffering badly and many factories, including mine, had to close. My marriage fell apart too. I therefore had to look around for another solution. When Caritas looked for an engineer to help them with the development of local tractor manufacturing in Bangladesh, we both found that this could be a match made in heaven.

In 1979, I moved to Bangladesh and started working in the Mirpur Agricultural Workshop and Training School (MAWTS). It was there that the Mennonite Agricultural project (MCC) asked me for help, not with tractors, but with the Rower pump: a simple direct-action pump for small-scale irrigation that had been field tested in Comilla. We worked together with Dan Spare on improving the manufacturing processes and using only local materials; eventually we managed to ensure maintenance was possible without using any tools. The MCC ordered 1,000 pumps; this helped the MAWTS to launch a manufacturing process at large scale. Luckily the MAWTS had a small group of professionals that helped me in identifying small factories that used indigenous technologies.

At the same time another NGO, Rangpur Dinajpur Rural Service (RDRS), was implementing a small-scale irrigation project in the north of the country, using treadle pumps. They had a large market for these pumps but not enough manufacturing capacity. This was a great opportunity for some of our trainees, who could set up small rural workshops with relatively little help. So, within a short time, Bangladesh established a manufacturing capacity of about five thousand pumps annually.    

There was a lot going on at the time with regard to irrigation pumps, but the drinking water pumps were not that prominently on the agenda. The World Bank-UNDP Water and Sanitation Programme and UNICEF were keen to get some development started as the No. 6 pumps were not very reliable. They approached MAWTS to see whether the training school would be interested. After several meetings between Ken Gibbs (UNICEF), Tim Journey (World Bank), Md Ikramullah and myself (MAWTS), we agreed that we would, based on the Rower pump technology, work on a direct-action drinking water pump. Many components of the Rower pump could be used for drinking water but some others (for instance the filters) would need to be invented.

Within a few days we had a working prototype which we thought seemed promising, and UNICEF placed an order for 110 pumps with MAWTS. In the good old days, procurement was not fully regulated;  thus the 110 pumps were manufactured and delivered before the purchase order even reached MAWTS. Field testing showed some good results, and we started working on the development of an all-plastic filter. Tim [Journey] found an article about a Robo-screen, tried in Australia. We replicated the design and started producing this screen. Caritas Switzerland sent us a sizeable number of 0.25mm wide milling cutters, which we needed to finalise the production process.

Once the testing pumps design was successful, it was transferred to India where the Indian Bureau of Standards took it up; the Tara pump was then turned into a national standard.

After 3 years in Bangladesh, in 1984, I decided to turn down an offer to join the World Bank-UNDP Water and Sanitation Programme and returned to Switzerland to join SKAT. The Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC) agreed that the World Bank could pay for the services that SKAT would offer. A very fruitful cooperation started and my career as a handpump specialist began.     

The Birth of the Handpump Technology Network, and the Rural Water Supply Network

By 1992, handpump technology had made its way into rural water supply. Many local governments started to accept the point sources with handpumps for drinking water. The policy promotion by UNICEF and the World Bank made handpump supplies viable. With this change in the environment, it became interesting to enter the market; competition was fierce between pump manufacturers. To get some stability into the sector, the UNDP-World Bank project decided a handpump workshop would be helpful. The venue for this workshop was Kakamega Golf Club in western Kenya. About 50 experts came together to discuss the technology aspect of handpumps. 

The meeting point was ideal as Kakamega did not offer many distractions. Even going out for a meal was a bit of an adventure. You had to bring a very strong fork to be able to penetrate the chicken.   

Kakamega was a small town with several thousand handpumps. There was a Finish project that had used India MKII pumps initially and had just recently decided to change to Afridevs. It was a new a concept that you could take the piston out without lifting the cylinder and there was still quite a bit scepticism about the open top arrangement.

As usual in a competitive environment, people felt very strongly about who had the best hamdpump design. The two pumps in the public domain, the India KMII (cheap but sturdy) and the Afridev (with more unusual design aspects) were also fighting for acceptance. The arguments were often dominated by arguments such as “not designed by me”. I too had some strong views on designs and we were discussing design details for hours. The arguments often run up to the early hours; since the Golf club did not have a bar there was also no option of a final conciliatory drink. 

There were some wise men in the group who concluded we were wasting a lot of energy without coming to a useful result. Peter Wurzel and Rupert Talbot suggested that the arguments would go on for ever and it would be best to form a design group: the Handpump design working group. Peter Wurzel should be the chairperson of the group, with Scott Devereux from Consumer Research in England, Leif Hommelgaard from UNDP-WB and me as permanent members.

And that’s how the Handpump Technology Network was formed without defined Terms of Reference or constitution. We concentrated on a few aspects, namely standardisation and handpump specifications.   Rupert, Leif and Peter kept a good eye on me and helped me to find some support from the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation. Handpump specifications were generally accepted as key documents for public domain pumps. Piers Cross of the World Bank suggested in 2006 that the Handpump Technology Network should broaden its remit from handpumps only to rural water supply more generally; and this is how the Rural Water Supply Network was born.   

About the author: Erich Baumann is an internationally recognized technical expert in the field of rural water supply with 30 years of experience. He headed the secretariat of RWSN (formerly the Handpump Technology Network HTN) from 1992 to 2008. He was instrumental in establishing the network in supply chains, low cost drilling, self-supply household solutions, handpump research and development, capacity building in local production, technology transfer, quality control and quality assurance, and training. He authored many publications on handpumps and rural water supply which can be found here.

Did you enjoy this blog? Would you like to share your perspective on the rural water sector  or your story as a rural water professional? We are inviting all RWSN Members to contribute to this 30th anniversary blog series. The best blogs will be selected for publication. Please see the blog guidelines here and contact us (ruralwater[at]skat.ch) for more information. You are also welcome to support RWSN’s work through our online donation facility. Thank you for your support.

Photo credit: Erich Baumann

Why self supply solutions are needed to reach SDG 6.1

This year we are celebrating 30 years since the Rural Water Supply Network was formally founded. From very technical beginnings as a group of (mostly male) experts – the Handpump Technology Network- we have evolved to be a diverse and vibrant network of over 13,000 people and 100 organisations working on a wide range of topics. Along the way, we have earned a reputation for impartiality, and become a global convener in the rural water sector.

RWSN would not be what it is today without the contributions and tireless efforts of many our members, organisations and people. As part of RWSN’s 30th anniversary celebration, we are running a blog series, inviting our friends and experts in the sector to share their thoughts and experiences in the rural water sector.

This is a guest blog by RWSN members Lieselotte Heederik and Steven Ramsey , based in Indonesia.

Only 9% of the 275 million Indonesians use piped water supplied by water utilities for their daily needs  and this percentage is decreasing.  In this Blog we talk why governments and other institutions should prioritize self-supply solutions.  We also discuss how decentralized water supply and treatment can help to  achieve universal access to safely managed drinking water.

To achieve universal access to safely managed drinking water by 2030, the Indonesian government and international institutions like the World Bank have focused on increasing piped water access. However, as in many developing countries in the global south, access to piped water in Indonesia remains exceedingly low. Local water utility companies, known as PDAM, only reach about 20% of Indonesian households, of which, less than half use PDAM water for their daily needs. Since only 9% of Indonesians use PDAM supplied water, this implies that 91% of Indonesia’s population use groundwater for domestic use. 91% of Indonesia’s population of 275 million people is around 250.25 million people. To put that number in perspective, that’s larger than the populations of Germany, the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, France, Sweden, and Denmark combined!

Can Piped Water Meet Indonesia’s Domestic Needs? 

Water utilities should serve 40 percent of the population by 2019. At least that was planned in the Indonesian Government’s 2015–2019 medium term development plan.  As we now know, this target was not met and was moved to the 2020–2024 plan. However the question remains, why does Indonesian government planning focus so heavily on piped water? One reason may come with the prestige that comes with having advanced public utility service.  Unfortunately, it’s unlikely that piped water will play a leading role in achieving universal access to safely managed drinking water, and here’s why: 

  1. For decades PDAMs have struggled to meet demand from rapid urbanization. This has led to groundwater overexploitation in many urban areas leading to land subsidence, most notably in Jakarta.
  2. Bulk raw water resources only supply 30 percent of total demand. With no clear path towards increasing supply, this has led to many PDAMs providing only intermittent service. 
  3. Higher tariffs incentivize PDAMs to prioritize water allocation to industrial usage. This is especially true in low income areas where tariff collection rates are lower. 
  4. Once a well is dug, groundwater is essentially free, compared with having to pay a monthly bill with PDAM water.

Even where access exists, the source is often not safely managed. 

With PDAMs struggling to meet even a quarter of domestic demand, it’s no surprise that water quality has taken the back burner. A government study conducted in 2020 found 148 PDAMs produced water that was not safe to drink. Another study in Yogyakarta found 77% of piped water was contaminated with e-coli. This isn’t to say that groundwater quality is any better, in fact it’s often worse, especially if coming from an unprotected source. One study in Jakarta found 24% of samples coming from a groundwater source had fecal matter compared with just 3% coming from piped water. Even bottled water isn’t necessarily free from contamination. In both aforementioned studies, e-coli was detected in water purchased from refill kiosks.

Village water supply. This is how most households in Indonesia get their -untreated- water to their houses. Treatment is necessary to make this safe for consumption. 

Solution: Decentralized, self-help centered water filters.

In order to achieve SDG target 6.1 Indonesia must achieve universal access to safely managed drinking water by 2030. However, only 12 percent of Indonesia’s population currently has such access. The 242 million Indonesians without access to safely managed drinking water cannot wait for expensive centralized utility projects and it’s unrealistic that these will reach all rural-communities. 

Surely, in certain contexts, such as high density urban areas, investing in piped water utilities may make sense. However, as Unicef states in their recent policy brief, self supply solutions with appropriate household water treatment are an important part of the safely managed water supply mix.  Household water treatment solutions provide households with a tool to filter rain, tap, and groundwater into water that is safe to drink in a matter of hours. Together, with investment in safe and sustainably managed groundwater, household water treatment solutions play a critical role in filling the gap between potable and safe drinking water.

About the authors:

Lieselotte (Lisa) Heedrik is the co-founder and director of Nazava Water Filters. Nazava is a social enterprise based in Indonesia, Kenya, and Ethiopia that produces ceramic, gravity based household water filters that are certified by WHO for bacterial removal. Nazava has sold over 200,000 units and has been exported to 32 countries worldwide. Lisa has over 15 years of International development experience and is passionate about embracing household solutions to reach SDG 6.
Steven Ramsey is a consultant with Nazava Water Filters with over 6 years experience working on water and climate resilience projects in the Middle East and Southeast Asia. Steven is a Fulbright alumnus and graduate of the Elliott School of International Affairs where he concentrated on Global Energy & Environmental Policy. He is passionate about finding climate resilient solutions in the WASH sector. 

Featured photo: Water provided through tanks in a village in West Java. Treatment is necessary to make it safe for consumption.

Photo credits: Lisa Heedrick.


Tirer parti de la puissance collaborative du RWSN

Cette année, nous célébrons les 30 ans de la création officielle du Réseau rural d’approvisionnement en eau. Après des débuts très techniques en tant que groupe d’experts (essentiellement masculins) – le Handpump Technology Network – nous sommes devenus un réseau diversifié et dynamique de plus de 13 000 personnes et 100 organisations travaillant sur un large éventail de sujets. Au fil du temps, nous avons acquis une réputation d’impartialité et sommes devenus un rassembleur mondial dans le secteur de l’eau en milieu rural.

Le RWSN ne serait pas ce qu’il est aujourd’hui sans les contributions et les efforts inlassables de nos nombreux membres, organisations et personnes. Dans le cadre de la célébration du 30e anniversaire du RWSN, nous organisons une série de blogs, invitant nos amis et experts du secteur à partager leurs réflexions et expériences dans le secteur de l’eau en milieu rural.

Ceci est un blog de Louisa Gosling, membre du RWSN, basée au Royaume-Uni.

Ayant travaillé avec des ONG internationales pendant 40 ans, je suis bien consciente que le développement international doit être un véritable effort de collaboration et j’ai toujours essayé de le soutenir. Les solutions pour l’accès à l’eau semblent relativement simples pour les personnes externes au secteur. Le besoin d’eau potable n’est pas controversé et n’est pas nouveau. Alors pourquoi est-ce que cela reste un problème si important pour tant de personnes ? Comment pouvons-nous progresser alors que les moteurs de l’inégalité sont si profondément ancrés et que la volonté politique de s’y attaquer semble plus faible que jamais ?

J’ai rejoint WaterAid en 2008 en tant que conseiller en matière d’équité et d’inclusion. Je me suis impliquée pour la première fois dans le RWSN en tant que coresponsable du thème Leave No One Behind en 2011 et j’ai eu le grand honneur d’en être la présidente de 2019 à 2021.

Le RWSN est un incroyable réseau de personnes et d’institutions possédant un énorme éventail d’expériences et d’expertises. Cette diversité rend possible la cocréation de connaissances et de solutions aux défis de l’eau en milieu rural, en combinant des connaissances spécifiques au contexte avec l’expérience de la résolution de problèmes d’échelle. Le réseau peut remettre en question la prédominance traditionnelle des solutions générées par le Nord et accroître la représentation des connaissances et de l’expérience des praticiens travaillant dans les pays à faible revenu, connaissances essentielles pour trouver des solutions qui fonctionnent. Une récente consultation des membres a débouché sur une feuille de route visant à améliorer l’équilibre du partage des connaissances.

Ma passion particulière a été de travailler avec les membres du réseau afin de découvrir et d’éliminer les obstacles qui continuent à marginaliser les populations rurales – y compris les facteurs sociaux, attitudinaux et politiques de négligence. 8 personnes sur 10 n’ayant pas accès à l’eau potable vivent dans des zones rurales : une amélioration inacceptable depuis 1992, où ce chiffre était de 90 %.

Louisa Gosling au Forum RWSN de 2016 à Abidjan

Les droits de l’homme à l’eau et à l’assainissement sont discutés au sein du réseau depuis 2010. Les rapporteurs successifs de l’ONU ont reconnu la valeur unique du RWSN pour générer une véritable discussion sur la façon de faire en sorte que les droits de l’homme aient plus de poids sur le terrain, en particulier dans les zones où les problèmes sont les plus graves. Les droits de l’homme mettent l’accent sur l’égalité – tout le monde devrait avoir accès.

Ils mettent également l’accent sur la redevabilité. Ce sujet a été largement débattu au sein du réseau. La redevabilité, ou plutôt l’absence de redevabilité, a un impact sur tous les aspects et tous les niveaux de l’approvisionnement en eau en milieu rural. Qu’il s’agisse des préoccupations mondiales relatives à la faiblesse des finances et de la gouvernance, de la nécessité de demander des comptes aux gouvernements pour qu’ils respectent leurs engagements, ou des questions très spécifiques de responsabilité en matière de qualité et de durabilité, comme celles mises en évidence par la recherche “Halte aux dégradations” sur les causes de la corrosion des pompes manuelles.

La dynamique du genre dans le domaine de l’eau a également été au centre des préoccupations du réseau. La vie des femmes rurales est dominée par leur capacité à accéder à l’eau et pourtant, ce secteur reste obstinément un domaine patriarcal.  Les hommes dominent toujours le secteur sur le plan professionnel, ce qui se traduit par une focalisation sur les solutions techno-centriques, avec une moindre compréhension des dynamiques sociales et de pouvoir qui sont intrinsèques à l’approvisionnement en eau. Les hommes dominent également la prise de décision dans les contextes locaux et nationaux, excluant de fait les femmes des décisions importantes concernant la fourniture et l’entretien de l’approvisionnement en eau. Ceci en dépit des preuves croissantes que l’implication des femmes augmente la durabilité. Le guide pratique sur l’autonomisation des femmes par le biais d’activités d’approvisionnement en eau en milieu rural, co-créées par les membres du RWSN, devraient être une lecture essentielle pour tous les professionnels de l’eau.

Dalia Soda, mécanicienne de pompe, à l’un des forages qu’elle entretient dans le village de Nzeremu, district de Salima, Malawi, juin 2016.

Les discussions du réseau ont également généré une plus grande visibilité et compréhension des barrières qui excluent certaines personnes au sein des communautés rurales : les personnes handicapées, les personnes âgées et les groupes de population spécifiques marginalisés dans différents contextes. Cela inclut par exemple les récentes discussions sur les groupes pastoraux.  Les retombées de ces discussions ont donné lieu à des recueils collaboratifs de conseils pratiques, comme cette page de ressources sur l’eau, l’assainissement et l’hygiène inclusifs pour les personnes handicapées.

Les défis liés à l’eau auxquels sont confrontées les populations rurales sont de plus en plus difficiles et urgents. Il existe de nombreux exemples de solutions, d’innovations et de bonnes pratiques, mais un effort considérable est nécessaire pour en tirer des enseignements, les faire partager, les utiliser, les adapter, et pour générer la volonté politique et les ressources financières nécessaires.   

La valeur unique du RWSN est de plus en plus reconnue par les institutions de recherche ainsi que par les organisations et les individus qui cherchent des solutions pratiques aux problèmes auxquels ils sont confrontés sur le terrain. Le réseau est devenu ce qu’il est aujourd’hui grâce au soutien de donateurs clairvoyants, tels que l’Agence suisse de coopération et de développement et WaterAid, entre autres. Mais comme une partie de ce soutien touche à sa fin, davantage de ressources sont nécessaires pour maintenir ce moteur essentiel de la collaboration en matière d’approvisionnement en eau en milieu rural.

A propos de l’auteur :

Louisa Gosling travaille dans le domaine du développement international depuis 40 ans. Elle a rejoint WaterAid en tant que conseillère en équité et inclusion en 2008. Ce rôle a évolué pour se concentrer plus largement sur les droits humains à l’eau et à l’assainissement en mettant l’accent sur l’égalité, la gouvernance et la responsabilité, en soutenant les collègues de WaterAid et d’autres acteurs du secteur pour développer la compréhension et la pratique de ces domaines. Elle travaille avec le RWSN depuis 2011 en tant que co-responsable du thème Leave no-one behind et plus récemment en tant que présidente de 2019 à 2021. Depuis 2022, elle travaille en tant que consultante indépendante et soutient actuellement le travail de l’organisation Accountability for Water.


Avez-vous apprécié ce blog ? Vous souhaitez partager votre point de vue sur le secteur de l’eau en milieu rural ou votre histoire en tant que professionnel de l’eau en milieu rural ? Nous invitons tous les membres du RWSN à contribuer à cette série de blogs du 30ème anniversaire. Les meilleurs blogs seront sélectionnés pour être publiés et traduits. Veuillez consulter les directives du blog ici et nous contacter (ruralwater[at]skat.ch) pour plus d’informations. Vous êtes également invités à soutenir le travail du RWSN par le biais de notre système de dons en ligne. Nous vous remercions de votre soutien.


Crédit photo :
1. Réunion dans la province de Nampula au Mozambique lors de l’évaluation d’un projet d’eau rurale en août 2019. Les villageois n’étaient pas contents car la pompe ne fournissait vraiment pas assez d’eau pour tout le monde et tombait toujours en panne en raison d’une utilisation excessive. Louisa écoute les villageois expliquer leurs problèmes. Copyright : Louisa Gosling.
2. Dalia Soda, mécanicienne de pompe, à l’un des forages qu’elle entretient dans le village de Nzeremu, district de Salima, Malawi, juin 2016.(Copyright: WaterAid / Alexia Webster).

Leveraging the collaborative power of RWSN

This year we are celebrating 30 years since the Rural Water Supply Network was formally founded. From very technical beginnings as a group of (mostly male) experts – the Handpump Technology Network- we have evolved to be a diverse and vibrant network of over 13,000 people and 100 organisations working on a wide range of topics. Along the way, we have earned a reputation for impartiality, and become a global convener in the rural water sector.

RWSN would not be what it is today without the contributions and tireless efforts of many our members, organisations and people. As part of RWSN’s 30th anniversary celebration, we are running a blog series, inviting our friends and experts in the sector to share their thoughts and experiences in the rural water sector.

This is a guest blog by RWSN member Louisa Gosling, based in the UK.

Having worked with International NGOs for 40 years, I am well aware that international development has to be a truly collaborative effort and have always tried to support this. The solutions to water access seem relatively straightforward to people outside the sector. The need for safe drinking water is not controversial, nor is it new. So why is it still such a massive problem for so many people? How can we make progress when the drivers of inequality are so deeply embedded and the political will to address them seem weaker than ever?

I joined WaterAid in 2008 as an advisor on equity and inclusion. I first became  involved with RWSN as a Co-Leader of the Leave No One Behind Theme  in 2011 and had the great honour of being the chair from 2019-2021.

RWSN is an incredible network of individuals and institutions with a huge range of experience and expertise. This diversity makes possible the co-creation of knowledge and solutions to rural water challenges, combining context specific knowledge with experience of tackling issues of scale. The network can challenge the traditional dominance of northern-generated solutions and increase the representation of knowledge and experience from practitioners working in low-income countries, knowledge that is essential to find solutions that work. A recent consultation with members resulted in a road map to improve the balance of knowledge sharing.

My particular passion has been working with network members to uncover and address the barriers that continue to marginalise rural populations – including social, attitudinal and political drivers of neglect. 8 out of 10 people without access to safe water live in rural areas: an unacceptably tiny improvement since 1992 when it was 90%.

Louisa at the RWSN Forum in Abidjan in 2016

Human rights to water and sanitation have been discussed on the network since 2010. Successive UN Rapporteurs have recognised the unique value of RWSN to generate genuine discussion on how to make human rights have more traction on the ground, especially in areas where issues are worst. The human rights emphasise equality – everyone should have access.

They also emphasise accountability. This topic has been widely discussed in the network. Accountability, or rather the lack of it, impacts every aspect and every level of rural water supply. From global concerns about weak finance and governance, holding governments to account to act on their commitments, to very specific issues of accountability for quality and sustainability, such as those highlighted by the “Stop the rot” research on causes of  handpump corrosion.

Gender dynamics in water have also been a focus of the network. The lives of rural women are dominated by their ability to access water and yet it stubbornly remains a patriarchal field.  Men still dominate the sector professionally, resulting in a focus on techno-centric solutions with less understanding of the social and power dynamics which are intrinsic to water supply. Men also dominate decision-making in local and national contexts, effectively excluding women from substantive decisions about the provision and maintenance of water supply. This is in spite of growing evidence that women’s involvement increases sustainability. The practical guidelines on gender equality in rural water supply, co-created by RWSN members, should be essential reading for all water professionals.Network discussions have also generated more visibility and understanding of barriers that exclude certain people within rural communities: those with disabilities, older people, and specific population groups marginalised in different contexts. This includes for instance the recent discussions on pastoralists.  Spin offs from these discussions have resulted in collaborative collections of practical guidance such as this resource page on disability inclusive WASH: https://www.internationaldisabilityalliance.org/DisabilityInclusiveWASH

Pump mechanic Dalia Soda at one of the boreholes she maintains in the village of Nzeremu, Salima District, Malawi, June 2016

The water challenges faced by rural populations are getting tougher and more urgent. There are many examples of solutions, innovations, and good practice, but a huge push is needed to learn from these, get them shared, used, adapted, and to generate the political will and financial resources needed.   

RWSN’s unique value is increasingly recognised by research institutions as well as organisations and individuals seeking practical solutions to the problems they face on the ground. The network has become what it is today thanks to the support of some far-sighted donors such as the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation and WaterAid, amongst others. But as some of this support is coming to an end, more resources are needed to maintain this essential driver of collaboration on rural water supply.


Louisa Gosling has worked in International development for 40 years, first joining WaterAid as Equity and inclusion advisor in 2008. This role evolved to focus more broadly on human rights to water and sanitation with a focus on equality, governance and accountability, supporting WaterAid colleagues and others in the sector to develop understanding and practice of these areas. She has worked with the RWSN since 2011 as co-leader of the Leave no-one behind theme and more recently as chair from 2019-2021. Since 2022 she has been working as a freelance consultant currently supporting the work of accountability for water – https://www.accountabilityforwater.org/.  

Did you enjoy this blog? Would you like to share your perspective on the rural water sector  or your story as a rural water professional? We are inviting all RWSN Members to contribute to this 30th anniversary blog series. The best blogs will be selected for publication and translation. Please see the blog guidelines here and contact us (ruralwater[at]skat.ch) for more information. You are also welcome to support RWSN’s work through our online donation facility. Thank you for your support.

Photo credits:

1. Meeting in Nampula province Mozambique during an evaluation of a rural water scheme in August 2019.  The villagers were not happy as the pump was really not proving enough water for everyone and was always breaking down due to excessive use. Louisa is listening to the villagers explaining their issues. Copyright: Louisa Gosling.

2. Pump mechanic Dalia Soda at one of the boreholes she maintains in the village of Nzeremu, Salima District, Malawi, June 2016.(Copyright: WaterAid / Alexia Webster)

My experience setting up a resource centre for rural water professionals

This year we are celebrating 30 years since the Rural Water Supply Network was formally founded. From very technical beginnings as a group of (mostly male) experts – the Handpump Technology Network- we have evolved to be a diverse and vibrant network of over 13,000 people and 100 organisations working on a wide range of topics. Along the way, we have earned a reputation for impartiality, and become a global convener in the rural water sector.

RWSN would not be what it is today without the contributions and tireless efforts of many our members, organisations and people. As part of RWSN’s 30th anniversary celebration, we are running a blog series on rwsn.blog, inviting our friends and experts in the sector to share their thoughts and experiences in the rural water sector.

This is a guest blog by RWSN Young Professional Justine Olweny, based in Uganda.

How I’ve ended up working in the rural water sector:

I’ve often wanted to add value to a situation. When encountered a challenge, I actively got involved and explore ways to provide solutions in reducing suffering and/or increasing performance as a team and celebrating alongside. I grew up in a drilling camp in Uganda and saw my Dad (who was a Water Engineer) drill boreholes in the early 1990s but later noticed how the services they were providing were raw. I convinced myself that if I could, I would like to improve the way my Dad provided access to safe water, sanitation and hygiene.

I have a background in information technology and management. In 2017 I set up my own start-up in the water sector in Uganda, Water Access Consulting. Since then my team has grown from three to eleven people across three offices. We are involved in various activities in the water sector in Uganda: groundwater exploration, water well drilling supervision, water quality testing, hygiene promotion, and plastic waste recycling. We also have a water, sanitation and hygiene (WaSH) resource centre in Kitgum to share knowledge and skills to water supply practitioners across Northern Uganda and South Sudan; you can read more about it here.

Today, I feel satisfied and at my best in the business of enhancing the delivery of safe water supply using inexpensive technologies to the low-income persons living in the remote part of the country to improve their lives in a meaningful way.

Water Access Consulting team doing water quality testing

The main challenges I have encountered in my work:

  1. Getting along with my engineering colleagues: with my managerial and information system background, I prefer to approach a problem from the customer’s perspective and this doesn’t always go smoothly with my engineering colleagues since they already have a specific predetermined set of standards in addressing a similar situation; this can cause emotional and physical issues with the project team.
  2. Making Mistakes: in my consultancy roles I always try new ideas and some end up in the south; I admit and apologize, but it takes a lot of courage. Sometimes offering a quick solution and fixing the mess on my own takes a lot of time, and I need to convince myself that it’s okay to move on.
  3. Time Management: with the new normal after the COVID19 disruption, the level of uncertainties has increased and today it is extremely difficult to manage time when I’m settling into a new role and adjusting my updated responsibilities.

What I like the most about RWSN:

Two things stand out for me as:

  1. Multicultural interaction of best practices and shared experiences by water supply practitioners across the globe on how they tackle water crises in their own region, and
  2. The RWSN mentoring program for young professionals, through which my mentor Diana Keesiga relentlessly encouraged, inspired, and guided me into my full growth and development potential.

Where I see myself and the rural water sector in my country in the next 5 years:

I was privileged to follow closely the Ugandan Government’s rural water supply reform trends from the end of the 1990s up to now including the revised Strategic Sector Investment Plan that was completed in 2009. All these efforts together with other numerous campaigns by the relevant Authorities under the Ministry of water and environment demonstrate the goodwill and commitments of the Ugandan government to enact appropriate policies that promote private-public partnerships and a rural water supply market-based approach. This would transform traditional right-based approach beneficiaries into customers by challenging the low-income population in the remote parts of the country to embrace their rights and responsibilities to pay for water services.

This huge milestone has opened doors for local entrepreneurs to thrive by supporting the government’s mandate and initiatives of promoting access to safe water as a business that is replicated with little to no government subsidies. I believe that by 2027-2030 rural water supply will be transformed from a stand-alone hand pump installed borehole located approximately 2 kilometers away from a household with a long queue of yellow 20 liter jerrican waiting to be carried over a woman’s head, into an in house water tap that is operated and maintained by private businesses creating employment, reducing ill health and increasing productivity through time-saving that stabilize our economy.

As for myself: my company, Water Access Consulting, has been shortlisted among the 110 participants for the Bayer Social Innovation Award. The next step will be public voting which will start from the 10th of August up to the 16th of August 2022. You can support us by voting here:
https://getinthering.co/bayer-public-voting-africa-middle-east/
With the funding from this award and the coaching and mentoring provided, I would expand my company and my resource and learning centre so that it can benefit more rural water professionals and Uganda and beyond.

About the author:

Justine Olweny is a Program Director and co-founder of Water Access Consulting, with experience managing diverse water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) professionals. Justine Olweny graduated with a bachelor degree in information system and Technology with bias in Water supply. You can connect with him on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/justine-olweny-0064496b/

He has co-founded an organisation Water Access Consulting that has directly impacted 144,578 lives in Uganda including children, youth, women and persons with disabilities with access to safe water, sanitation and hygiene. As of today, Justine’s company has surveyed and help drilled up to 372 water wells across Sub Saharan Africa.

Do you have a story to share with other RWSN members, about the rural water sector, your work, and your passions? We are encouraging members to contribute to our 30th anniversary blog series. Please see the guidelines for contributions here – we will select the best blogs for publications before November 2022.

Photo credit: Justine Olweny/ Water Access Consulting

Comment j’ai créé un centre de ressources pour les professionnels de l’eau en milieu rural

Cette année, nous célébrons les 30 ans de la création officielle du Réseau rural d’approvisionnement en eau. Après des débuts très techniques en tant que groupe d’experts (essentiellement masculins) – le Handpump Technology Network – nous sommes devenus un réseau diversifié et dynamique de plus de 13 000 personnes et 100 organisations travaillant sur un large éventail de sujets. Au fil du temps, nous avons acquis une réputation d’impartialité et sommes devenus un rassembleur mondial dans le secteur de l’eau en milieu rural.

Le RWSN ne serait pas ce qu’il est aujourd’hui sans les contributions et les efforts inlassables de nos nombreux membres, organisations et personnes. Dans le cadre de la célébration du 30e anniversaire de RWSN, nous organisons une série de blogs sur rwsn.blog, invitant nos amis et experts du secteur à partager leurs réflexions et expériences dans le secteur de l’eau en milieu rural.

Ceci est un blog d’un jeune professionnel du RWSN, Justine Olweny, basé en Ouganda.

Comment j’en suis venu à travailler dans le secteur de l’eau en milieu rural :

J’ai souvent voulu apporter une valeur ajoutée à une situation. Lorsque j’ai rencontré un défi, je me suis impliqué activement et j’ai exploré les moyens d’apporter des solutions pour réduire les souffrances et/ou augmenter les performances en équipe et en célébration. J’ai grandi dans un camp de forage en Ouganda et j’ai vu mon père (qui était ingénieur en eau) forer des puits de forage au début des années 1990, mais j’ai remarqué par la suite que les services qu’ils fournissaient n’étaient pas optimaux. Je me suis convaincu que si je le pouvais, j’aimerais améliorer la manière dont mon père assurait l’accès à l’eau potable, à l’assainissement et à l’hygiène.

J’ai une formation en technologies de l’information et en gestion. En 2017, j’ai créé ma propre start-up dans le secteur de l’eau en Ouganda, Water Access Consulting. Depuis, mon équipe est passée de trois à onze personnes réparties dans trois bureaux. Nous participons à diverses activités dans le secteur de l’eau en Ouganda : exploration des eaux souterraines, supervision du forage de puits d’eau, tests de qualité de l’eau, promotion de l’hygiène et recyclage des déchets plastiques. Nous disposons également d’un centre de ressources sur l’eau, l’assainissement et l’hygiène (WaSH) à Kitgum, qui permet de partager des connaissances et des compétences avec les praticiens de l’approvisionnement en eau du nord de l’Ouganda et du Sud-Soudan. Vous pouvez en lire plus à ce sujet ici.

Aujourd’hui, je me sens satisfait de mon entreprise qui consiste à améliorer l’approvisionnement en eau potable à l’aide de technologies peu coûteuses pour les personnes à faibles revenus vivant dans les régions reculées du pays, afin d’améliorer leur vie de manière significative.

L’équipe de Water Access Consulting étudiant la qualité de l’eau

Les principaux défis que j’ai rencontrés dans mon travail :

  1. S’entendre avec mes collègues ingénieurs : avec ma formation en gestion et en systèmes d’information, je préfère aborder un problème du point de vue du client et cela ne se passe pas toujours sans heurts avec mes collègues ingénieurs car ils ont déjà un ensemble de normes prédéterminées pour aborder une situation similaire ; cela peut provoquer des problèmes émotionnels et physiques avec l’équipe de projet.
  2. Faire des erreurs : dans mes rôles de consultant, j’essaie toujours de nouvelles idées et certaines n’aboutissent pas ; je l’admets et je m’excuse, mais cela demande beaucoup de courage. Parfois, proposer une solution rapide et réparer le désordre par moi-même prend beaucoup de temps, et je dois me convaincre de passer à autre chose.
  3. Gestion du temps : avec le retour à la normale après la perturbation de COVID19, le niveau d’incertitudes a augmenté et aujourd’hui, il est extrêmement difficile de gérer le temps lorsque je m’installe dans un nouveau projet et que j’adapte mes nouvelles responsabilités.

Ce que j’apprécie le plus de la part du RWSN :

Deux choses ressortent pour moi :

  • L’interaction multiculturelle des meilleures pratiques et des expériences partagées par les praticiens de l’approvisionnement en eau à travers le monde sur la façon dont ils abordent les crises de l’eau dans leur propre région
  • Le programme de mentorat RWSN pour les jeunes professionnels, grâce auquel mon mentor Diana Keesiga m’a encouragé, inspiré et guidé sans relâche vers mon plein potentiel de croissance et de développement.

Où je me vois et où je vois le secteur de l’eau en milieu rural dans mon pays dans les 5 prochaines années :

J’ai eu le privilège de suivre de près les tendances de la réforme de l’approvisionnement en eau en milieu rural du gouvernement ougandais depuis la fin des années 1990 jusqu’à aujourd’hui, y compris le plan stratégique d’investissement sectoriel révisé qui a été achevé en 2009. Tous ces efforts, ainsi que les nombreuses campagnes menées par les autorités compétentes sous l’égide du ministère de l’eau et de l’environnement, témoignent de la bonne volonté et de l’engagement du gouvernement ougandais à adopter des politiques appropriées pour promouvoir les partenariats public-privé et une approche de l’approvisionnement en eau en milieu rural basée sur le marché. Cela permettrait de transformer les bénéficiaires de l’approche traditionnelle fondée sur les droits en clients, en incitant la population à faible revenu des régions reculées du pays à assumer ses droits et ses responsabilités pour payer les services d’eau.

Cette étape importante a permis aux entrepreneurs locaux de prospérer en soutenant le mandat et les initiatives du gouvernement visant à promouvoir l’accès à l’eau potable en tant qu’activité commerciale pouvant être reproduite avec peu ou pas de subventions publiques. Je pense que d’ici 2027-2030, l’approvisionnement en eau en milieu rural sera passé d’un forage autonome installé avec une pompe manuelle à environ 2 kilomètres d’un foyer, avec une longue queue de jerricans de 20 litres jaunes attendant d’être portée sur la tête d’une femme, à un robinet d’eau à domicile exploité et entretenu par des entreprises privées, créant des emplois, réduisant les maladies et augmentant la productivité grâce à un gain de temps qui stabilise notre économie.

Pour ma part, mon entreprise, Water Access Consulting, a été présélectionnée parmi les 110 participants au prix Bayer de l’innovation sociale. La prochaine étape sera le vote du public, qui commencera le 10 août et se terminera le 16 août 2022. Vous pouvez nous soutenir en votant ici :
https://getinthering.co/bayer-public-voting-africa-middle-east/
Avec le financement de ce prix et l’accompagnement et le mentorat fournis, je développerais mon entreprise et mon centre de ressources et d’apprentissage afin qu’il puisse bénéficier à davantage de professionnels de l’eau en milieu rural, en Ouganda et au-delà.

À propos de l’auteur :

Justine Olweny est directeur et cofondateur de Water Access Consulting, avec une expérience de gestion de divers professionnels de l’eau, de l’assainissement et de l’hygiène (WASH). Justine Olweny est diplômé d’une licence en système d’information et technologie avec des biais dans l’approvisionnement en eau. Vous pouvez vous connecter avec lui sur LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/justine-olweny-0064496b/.

Il a cofondé une organisation, Water Access Consulting, qui a eu un impact direct sur 144 578 vies en Ouganda, y compris des enfants, des jeunes, des femmes et des personnes handicapées ayant accès à l’eau potable, à l’assainissement et à l’hygiène. À ce jour, l’entreprise de Justine a étudié et aidé à forer 372 puits d’eau en Afrique subsaharienne.

Avez-vous une histoire à partager avec les autres membres du RWSN, sur le secteur de l’eau en milieu rural, votre travail et vos passions ? Nous encourageons les membres à contribuer à notre série de blogs sur le 30ème anniversaire. Veuillez consulter les directives pour les contributions ici – nous sélectionnerons les meilleurs blogs pour des publications avant novembre 2022.

Crédit photo : Justine Olweny/ Water Access Consulting

RWSN shaped my professional life

This year we are celebrating 30 years since the Rural Water Supply Network was formally founded. From very technical beginnings as a group of (mostly male) experts – the Handpump Technology Network- we have evolved to be a diverse and vibrant network of over 13,000 people and 100 organisations working on a wide range of topics. Along the way, we have earned a reputation for impartiality, and become a global convener in the rural water sector.

RWSN would not be what it is today without the contributions and tireless efforts of many our members, organisations and people. As part of RWSN’s 30th anniversary celebration, we are running a blog series on rwsn.blog, inviting our friends and experts in the sector to share their thoughts and experiences in the rural water sector.

This is a guest blog by RWSN Member Dr. Kerstin Danert, based in Switzerland.

It was in Entebbe, Uganda, in late 2004, at my first meeting with the late Piers Cross, who was then managing the World Bank Water and Sanitation Programme (WSP) in Africa, that I was pulled into the orbit of RWSN. In fact, in 2004, RWSN was just being reshaped – out of the Handpump Technology Network (HTN). Piers had been put up to it by Erich Baumann, who, at the time, was running the RWSN secretariat, hosted in Skat in St. Gallen, Switzerland. We had interacted during my PhD research in Uganda a couple of years previous, with Erich even working hard on a treadle pump to help the drill team that I was working with to maintain circulation in a manually drilled well. We lost the borehole, but I made a friend and future mentor.

I had moved to Uganda in 1998, and by 2004, I was working as a freelance consultant; travelling all over the country in my short chassis Land Rover (yes – cliché I know) and spending time on various fascinating rural water supply and sanitation projects.

Aged 32, and, then working mainly with local NGOs, I have to say that the World Bank sounded rather grand. Piers offered me the role of Flagship Coordinator – Low Cost Drilling for RWSN, and WSP funded 60 days per year of my time for about 3 years.

I thus added RWSN to my portfolio of jobs at the time, and tried to figure out how to contribute to this reforming network – and to the “flagship”. Over the subsequent decade and a half, that flagship grew into the professional drilling work of today, and I somehow grew into the role of leading it.

I will spare you the details, but rather summarise it all as an ongoing steep learning curve! Together with Sally Sutton, who had the same role for Self-Supply, and Joe Narkevic leading a Supply Chains flagship, we tried to develop our topics and the network as a whole.

It is now 18 years since that first meeting with Piers in Entebbe, which I guess makes me an RWSN teenager. I have never looked back from saying yes. Not even once – not even when I was exhausted at times after having perhaps put in too much effort and energy.

For me, there is so much that I enjoy about working with, and for RWSN. The first point is the RURAL part. The needs of rural dwellers in relation to accessing water remain enormous, and – relatively speaking – are still unseen and massively underfunded. Secondly, I have appreciated the way that RWSN works. RWSN can be nimble, is open, and it is possible to ask difficult questions.

Having also taken on the role of leading the RWSN Secretariat from Erich Baumann in 2009, which I did up to 2017, I contributed to the way that RWSN operates. There has always been something very special to me about working with, and bringing together different people and different organisations, whether small or large, whether global or local, whether operating on shoestring budgets or with millions.

And so, as RWSN turns 30, let me thank it, and those who are part of this tremendous network, for almost two decades of opportunity to engage with different people and hear differing perspectives, and most importantly join hands with others are also trying to solve a very difficult problem – ensuring that all rural dwellers have satisfactory water supply services.

If you want to work more with RWSN, let the Secretariat, the theme leaders, and the Executive Steering Committee know about your ideas. The work of the network is nowhere near complete!

About the author: Kerstin Danert has led the RWSN theme of Professional Drilling since 2005. She was the director of the RWSN Secretariat from 2009 to 2017. Kerstin worked as a freelance consultant in Uganda from 2003 to 2008, and then joined Skat Consulting, in Switzerland, where she remained up to 2020. In 2020 she established Ask for Water GmbH, also based in Switzerland.

Photo: Kerstin observing manual drilling on her first field assignment with RWSN  – in Niger in 2005 – documenting the history of hand drilled wells in Niger.

Le RWSN a façonné ma vie professionnelle

Cette année, nous célébrons les 30 ans de la création officielle du Réseau rural d’approvisionnement en eau. Après des débuts très techniques en tant que groupe d’experts (essentiellement masculins au sein du Handpump Technology Network) nous avons évolué pour devenir un réseau diversifié et dynamique de plus de 13 000 personnes et 100 organisations travaillant sur un large éventail de sujets. Au fil du temps, nous avons acquis une réputation d’impartialité et sommes devenus un rassembleur mondial dans le secteur de l’eau en milieu rural.

Le RWSN ne serait pas ce qu’il est aujourd’hui sans les contributions et les efforts inlassables de nos nombreux membres, organisations et personnes. Dans le cadre de la célébration du 30e anniversaire du RWSN, nous organisons une série de blogs sur rwsn.blog, invitant nos amis et experts du secteur à partager leurs réflexions et expériences dans le secteur de l’eau en milieu rural.

Ceci est un blogue du Dr Kerstin Danert, membre du RWSN, basée en Suisse.

C’est à Entebbe, en Ouganda, à la fin de l’année 2004, lors de ma première rencontre avec feu Piers Cross, qui gérait alors le Programme Eau et Assainissement (WSP) de la Banque Mondiale en Afrique, que j’ai été attirée dans l’orbite du RWSN. En fait, en 2004, le RWSN venait juste d’être remodelé – à partir du Handpump Technology Network (HTN). Piers avait été mis sur la piste par Erich Baumann, qui, à l’époque, dirigeait le secrétariat du RWSN, hébergé à Skat, dans le canton de Saint-Gall, en Suisse. Nous avions eu des échanges lors de mes recherches doctorales en Ouganda quelques années auparavant, Erich ayant même travaillé dur sur une pompe à pédale pour aider l’équipe de forage avec laquelle je travaillais à maintenir la circulation dans un puits foré manuellement. Nous avons perdu le forage, mais je me suis fait un ami et un futur mentor.


J’ai déménagé en Ouganda en 1998, et en 2004, je travaillais comme consultant indépendant ; je voyageais dans tout le pays dans ma Land Rover à châssis court (oui – cliché, je sais) et je passais du temps sur divers projets ruraux fascinants d’approvisionnement en eau et d’assainissement.


À 32 ans, et alors que je travaillais principalement avec des ONG locales, je dois dire que la Banque mondiale me semblait plutôt grandiose. Piers m’a offert le rôle de coordinateur du thème sur le forage à faible coût pour le RWSN, et le WSP a financé 60 jours par an de mon temps pendant environ 3 ans.


J’ai donc ajouté le RWSN à mon portefeuille d’emplois à l’époque, et j’ai essayé de contribuer à ce réseau en cours de réforme – et au “thème”en question. Au cours de la quinzaine d’années qui a suivi, cela est devenu le travail de forage professionnel d’aujourd’hui, et j’ai en quelque sorte appris sur le tas à le diriger.


Je vais vous épargner les détails, mais plutôt résumer tout cela comme une courbe d’apprentissage abrupte et continue ! Avec Sally Sutton, qui avait le même rôle pour l’auto-approvisionnement, et Joe Narkevic, qui dirigeait un programme similaire sur les chaînes d’approvisionnement, nous avons essayé de développer nos thèmes et le réseau dans son ensemble.


Cela fait maintenant 18 ans que j’ai rencontré Piers à Entebbe, ce qui fait de moi une adolescente du RWSN. Je n’ai jamais regretté avoir dit oui. Pas une seule fois, même si j’étais parfois épuisée après avoir fourni trop d’efforts et d’énergie.


Pour moi, il y a tant de choses que j’apprécie dans le travail avec et pour RWSN. Le premier point est la partie RURALE. Les besoins des habitants des zones rurales en matière d’accès à l’eau restent énormes, et – relativement parlant – sont toujours invisibles et massivement sous-financés. Deuxièmement, j’ai apprécié le mode de fonctionnement du RWSN. Le RWSN peut être agile, il est ouvert et il est possible de poser des questions difficiles.


Ayant également pris la relève d’Erich Baumann à la tête du secrétariat du RWSN en 2009, ce que j’ai fait jusqu’en 2017, j’ai contribué au mode de fonctionnement du RWSN. Il y a toujours eu quelque chose de très spécial pour moi dans le fait de travailler avec et de rassembler différentes personnes et différentes organisations, qu’elles soient petites ou grandes, mondiales ou locales, qu’elles fonctionnent avec des budgets modestes ou des millions.


Ainsi, à l’occasion des 30 ans du RWSN, permettez-moi de le remercier, ainsi que ceux qui font partie de ce formidable réseau, pour près de deux décennies d’opportunités de s’engager auprès de différentes personnes, d’entendre des points de vue différents et, surtout, de se joindre à d’autres personnes qui tentent également de résoudre un problème très difficile : garantir que tous les habitants des zones rurales disposent de services d’approvisionnement en eau satisfaisants.


Si vous souhaitez travailler davantage avec le RWSN, faites part de vos idées au secrétariat, aux responsables de thèmes et au comité directeur. Le travail du réseau est loin d’être terminé !

A propos de l’auteur : Kerstin Danert dirige le thème du forage professionnel du RWSN depuis 2005. Elle a été directrice du secrétariat du RWSN de 2009 à 2017. Kerstin a travaillé comme consultante indépendante en Ouganda de 2003 à 2008, puis a rejoint Skat Consulting, en Suisse, où elle est restée jusqu’en 2020. En 2020, elle a créé Ask for Water GmbH, également basée en Suisse.

Photo : Kerstin observant le forage manuel lors de sa première mission sur le terrain avec RWSN – au Niger en 2005 – documentant l’histoire des puits forés à la main au Niger.

Série de blogues do 30th aniversário da RWSN: reflexões do Dr Peter Morgan

Este ano estamos a celebrar os 30 anos da fundação formal da Rede de Abastecimento de Água Rural (RWSN em ingles). Desde o início muito técnico como um grupo de peritos (na sua maioria homens) – a Handpump Technology Network (Rede de Tecnologia de bombas manuais)- evoluímos para ser uma rede diversificada e vibrante de mais de 13.000 pessoas e 100 organizações que trabalham numa vasta gama de tópicos. Ao longo do caminho, ganhámos uma reputação de imparcialidade, e tornámo-nos um convocador global no sector da água rural.

A RWSN não seria o que é hoje sem as contribuições e esforços incansáveis de muitos dos nossos membros, organizações e pessoas. Como parte da celebração do 30º aniversário da RWSN, estamos a correr uma série de blogues no rwsn.blog, convidando os nossos amigos e especialistas do sector a partilhar os seus pensamentos e experiências no sector da água rural.

O primeiro é o Dr. Peter Morgan, membro da RWSN, baseado no Zimbabué.

Dr. Morgan, porque começou a trabalhar no sector da água rural?

Bem, só comecei a trabalhar no sector da água rural em 1973 no que era então a Rodésia.

Continue reading “Série de blogues do 30th aniversário da RWSN: reflexões do Dr Peter Morgan”

Launch of RWSN’s 30th anniversary blog series: reflections from Dr Peter Morgan

This year we are celebrating 30 years since the Rural Water Supply Network was formally founded. From very technical beginnings as a group of (mostly male) experts – the Handpump Technology Network- we have evolved to be a diverse and vibrant network of over 13,000 people and 100 organisations working on a wide range of topics. Along the way, we have earned a reputation for impartiality, and become a global convener in the rural water sector.

RWSN would not be what it is today without the contributions and tireless efforts of many our members, organisations and people. As part of RWSN’s 30th anniversary celebration, we are running a blog series, inviting our friends and experts in the sector to share their thoughts and experiences in the rural water sector.

First up is RWSN Member Dr. Peter Morgan, based in Zimbabwe.

Dr Morgan, why did you start working in the rural water sector?

Well I only started working in the rural water sector in 1973 in what was then Rhodesia.

Continue reading “Launch of RWSN’s 30th anniversary blog series: reflections from Dr Peter Morgan”